Updates

Alliance Launched To Save Bees

Sixty-five chefs, restaurant owners and other culinary leaders joined us to launch the Bee Friendly Food Alliance. Through the Alliance, chefs and restaurateurs are calling attention to the importance of bees to our food supply, the dramatic die-off of bee populations, and the need to protect our pollinators. LEARN MORE.

News Release | Environment Massachusetts

Boston Named 3rd Smoggiest Metropolitan Area in the State.

Today Environment Massachusetts released a new report showing that the Boston area ranks as the 3rd smoggiest metropolitan area in the state.  Smog is a harmful air pollutant that leads to asthma attacks and exacerbates respiratory illnesses, especially among children and the elderly. The new report, Danger in the Air: Unhealthy Air Days in 2010 and 2011 shows that in total, residents in the Boston area were exposed to air quality that made it dangerous to breathe on 3 days last year.  Also, this summer alone, residents in the Boston area have already been alerted to unhealthy air on 8 days.

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Report | Environment Massachusetts

Danger in the Air

All Americans should be able to breathe clean air. But pollution from power plants and vehicles puts the health of our nation’s children and families at risk. Ground-level ozone, the main component of smog, is one of the most harmful and one of the most pervasive air pollutants. According to the American Lung Association, nearly half of all Americans – 48 percent – still live in areas with unhealthy levels of smog pollution.

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Headline

Patrick-Murray Administration Announces 91 Percent Reduction in Toxic Mercury Air Emissions

The Patrick-Murray Administration today announced that toxic mercury air emissions in Massachusetts have fallen by 91 percent since 1996, greatly exceeding the original goal of 75 percent, according to a study released by the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP). The reductions have been accomplished in part by the Administration's comprehensive efforts targeting mercury pollution from municipal waste combustors, coal-fired power plants, mercury-added products and other sources. To continue the progress in this area, Massachusetts will need strong federal and international actions similar to what has been accomplished in the Northeast. In particular, a proposed federal rule by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency would be a major step forward, by greatly reducing mercury pollution from coal-fired power plants across the country. Massachusetts' state rule for coal-fired plants is already more stringent than the proposed federal mercury limits, but the federal rule, if implemented, would be an important step forward in reducing toxic mercury transported on the winds from Midwest and Southeast states and deposited from the air into Massachusetts.

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Report | Environment Massachusetts

America's Biggest Mercury Polluters:

Power plants continue to release large amounts of toxic pollutants, including mercury, into our air. In 2010, two-thirds of all airborne mercury pollution in the United States came from the smokestacks of coal-fired power plants. In other words, power plants generate more airborne mercury pollution than all other industrial sources combined.*

Mercury is a potent neurotoxicant. Mercury exposure during critical periods of brain development can contribute to irreversible deficits in verbal skills, damage to attention and motor control, and reduced IQ.

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Report | Environment Massachusetts

Toxic Waterways:

 Coal-fired power plants are the single largest source of mercury pollution in the United States. Emissions from these plants eventually make their way into Massachusetts’ waterways, contaminating fish and wildlife. Many of Massachusetts’ waterways are under advisory because of mercury contamination. Eating contaminated fish is the main source of human exposure to mercury. Mercury pollution poses enormous public health threats.

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