Environment Massachusetts Latest Blog Posts

Tips for making the most of a backyard camping adventure.

 | by
Ben Hellerstein
State Director
Emma Searson
Director, 100% Renewable Campaign

Though the public health crisis brought on by COVID-19 has required the full attention of many of our state and national leaders for the past several months, the environmental crises we face persist. 

 | by
Ben Hellerstein
State Director

As the end of the 2019-2020 session approaches, the Legislature's energy committee is giving serious consideration to a bill that would power Massachusetts with 100% renewable energy.

Thank you to everyone who participated in the Greener Together writing contest! We are pleased to announce the winners.

With Mother’s Day right around the corner (May 10), many of us are making plans to celebrate our moms. Here are 12 ideas that you can use celebrate both your mom and nature this Mother’s Day.

Looking for some children’s books to help spark your young one’s love of nature? We’ve got you covered.

Earth Day was primed for a big celebration this year -- it's 50th. But with the novel coronavirus (COVID-19), it's an event that can't be celebrated with a big party. Still, that doesn't mean teachers (and parents teaching at home) can't connect with students on a broad array of environmental issues.

For 50 years, schools and communities across the country have celebrated Earth Day, holding educational events, clean-up projects and other activities to help kids learn about the planet and ways to protect it. But this year’s Earth Day school celebrations face a unique challenge. We pulled together a set resources that teachers can use in their virtual classrooms.

Many members of the animal kingdom live in simple burrows or nests, but some species go to great lengths to create incredible homes, colonies, and other structures. Their designs are ingenious and offer insight into how all living creatures adapt to their surroundings to create unique homes. Here are 10 great examples.

This incredible underwater wonder was designated a marine national monument in 2016 to ensure that everything from the seabed to the surface was protected. It is the first and only marine monument created in the U.S. Atlantic Ocean. Since its designation, scientists have flocked to this area.