Offshore wind becoming reality in Massachusetts: Vineyard Wind I breaks ground

The first commercial-scale offshore wind farm in the United States is closer to becoming a reality off the coast of Massachusetts. 

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John Stout
Content Creator

Author: John Stout

Content Creator

Started on staff: 2020
B.A., Pomona College

John creates content for the Environment America state groups. He was previously the transportation advocate for U.S. PIRG and MASSPIRG. John has co-authored multiple reports and numerous op-eds on transportation issues ranging from increased public transit to electrified vehicles to how e-bikes can help us tackle climate change. John lives in Boston with his wife, who works as a nurse at Boston Children's Hospital. They enjoy biking, surfing and eating.

The first commercial-scale offshore wind farm in the United States is closer to becoming a reality off the coast of Massachusetts.

On Nov. 18, Secretary of the Interior Deb Haaland joined Gov. Charlie Baker and others to celebrate the groundbreaking for Vineyard Wind 1, a project forecasted to generate 800 megawatts of electricity annually -- enough to power over 400,000 homes. The project plan includes the construction of 62 wind turbines in total, located approximately 15 miles south of Martha’s Vineyard and Nantucket.

“The advancement of Vineyard Wind 1 reflects an important step toward offshore wind taking a key place as a major contributor to our electricity supply," said Hannah Read, Environment America Research and Policy Center’s Go Big on Offshore Wind associate. "We are on the brink of unlocking an incredible amount of renewable energy potential, and this is just the beginning."

This project is a key component of the Biden administration’s commitment to developing 30 gigawatts (GW) of offshore wind by 2030. 

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Photo: The development of facilities such as the Wind Technology Testing Center in Charlestown is testament to the growing confidence Massachusetts has in offshore wind. Above, Environment Massachusetts State Director Ben Hellerstein, state Senator Mike Barrett and interim CEO for Massachusetts Clean Energy Center, Jen Daloisio tour the facility. Credit: Staff

John Stout
Content Creator

Author: John Stout

Content Creator

Started on staff: 2020
B.A., Pomona College

John creates content for the Environment America state groups. He was previously the transportation advocate for U.S. PIRG and MASSPIRG. John has co-authored multiple reports and numerous op-eds on transportation issues ranging from increased public transit to electrified vehicles to how e-bikes can help us tackle climate change. John lives in Boston with his wife, who works as a nurse at Boston Children's Hospital. They enjoy biking, surfing and eating.