100% Clean. 100% Possible.

Burning oil, gas and coal has not only polluted our air, water and land for decades. Now it’s changing our climate even faster than scientists feared it would. We can have healthier communities right now and a livable future for kids growing up today. But to get there, we need to transform the way we produce and consume energy.

That's why we’re calling for a nationwide commitment to 100% renewable power.

It’s a big, bold goal, one that would make America a world leader in the race toward a cleaner, healthier future — and it’s a goal that’s 100% possible.

Apple, Facebook, Google and more

Companies and municipalities are already making moves.

Consider: Companies ranging from Apple, Google and Facebook to Johnson & Johnson and Coca Cola have already committed to going 100% renewable. So have cities like San Diego, Rochester, Minn., and Lancaster, Calif.

Some cities, like Greensburg, Kan., Burlington, Vt. and Aspen, Colo., have already achieved 100% renewable energy.

Going 100% renewable is 100% possible.

What's more, solar power has tripled in America in just the last two years — with a new home or business going solar every one and a half minutes. In many states, wind power is now cheaper than gas or coal. Clean energy keeps growing faster, with prices dropping lower than even the most optimistic industry predictions of just a few years ago.

But we can do more, and we must do more to stave off the worst effects of climate change.

Wayne National Forest via Flickr, CC BY 2.0

We need to keep building momentum

It’s time to stop letting some slow-moving politicians drag their feet and start pushing them to step up and lead.

It’s time to sweep past the big energy interests — from Big Oil and gas companies like ExxonMobil and Chevron to utilities like Duke Energy and Pacific Gas & Electric, from climate deniers in Congress to the Koch brothers — that are not only standing in the way, but using their financial might and political clout to roll back renewable energy’s progress.

Join our call, and help your community go 100% renewable.

The more people who join our call for 100% renewable power, the more local, state, national and corporate leaders will step up and take action that will make a difference now and get us on the right track for the future.

Adam Perri

Why wait?

And we can’t wait: Scientists say we must stop burning virtually all fossil fuels by 2050 in order to spare kids growing up today from the devastating impacts of climate change.

And why should we wait?

Why wait for healthier communities with cleaner air and water when we can have them today?

Why wait until it’s impossible to leave the kids we know and love a safer, healthier tomorrow?

Why wait, when we can start changing the conversation about how we produce and consume energy — so it’s no longer a question of whether we’ll get to 100% renewable power, but how fast?

Why wait, when America has the responsibility, the ingenuity and the will to start leading the world to a 100% renewable future right now?

Steven Gilbert

We’ve got the power 

We’re ready for this. Our national network has done more to promote solar, wind and energy efficiency on the state and local level than any other group in the country. We’ve won clean energy policies, from pro-solar initiatives to clean cars programs to renewable energy standards in 22 states, all of which are driving down the costs of wind and solar, and driving down carbon pollution.

Now we need you to join this movement and the first step is an easy one: Add your name in support of a 100% renewable future.

Together, we can do this. A 100% renewable future based on 100% American-made energy is 100% possible. And it starts now.

Peter Kirkeskov Rasmussen via Flickr

100% Clean Energy Updates

News Release | Environment America

Statement: U.S. officially rejoins the international Paris Agreement

WASHINGTON -- The United States officially rejoined the international Paris Agreement on Friday. The act brings America back into a key accord aimed at reducing planet-warming emissions. 

Environment America had called on Biden to prioritize rejoining the Paris Agreement on his first day in office in the "First Things to Fix" report. The report presented 20 actions for the Biden administration to undertake in early days of office to undo the Trump administration’s rollbacks of environmental laws and protections.

> Keep Reading
Blog Post

Gov. Charlie Baker vetoes climate action bill | Mary Katherine Moore

If you were hoping for climate action in Massachusetts, you’ll have to wait at least a little longer. 

> Keep Reading
News Release | Environment America

Statement: President Biden to make important strides in climate action

WASHINGTON -- President Joseph Biden will release a far-reaching plan Wednesday that outlines the actions his administration will take to tackle climate change both domestically and internationally. With the scientific target squarely in focus -- reaching net zero emissions by 2050 in order to keep global warming below 1.5 degrees Celsius -- the new administration will lay out elements of a roadmap for the nation to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in sectors across society, from agriculture to manufacturing. 

> Keep Reading
News Release | Environment Massachusetts and MASSPIRG

Statement: Massachusetts makes important commitment to have all new cars sold in state produce zero emissions by 2035

Following California’s lead, Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker plans to phase out the sale of new gas-powered cars by 2035.

> Keep Reading
News Release | Environment America

Statement: Major deal on federal energy bill moves U.S. forward on renewables and climate action

Congress struck a last-minute bipartisan deal on a major energy bill expected to pass on Monday as part of the omnibus package to fund the federal government. The energy bill includes increased funding for renewable and energy efficiency programs. It also includes a landmark deal to phase out hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), which are especially potent greenhouse gases. The legislation soon to be heading to the president’s desk requires an 85 percent phase out of HFCs over 15 years, meaning the U.S. would join more than 170 other countries that have already made this commitment. Global phase out on this scale could avoid a 0.5 degree Celsius of warming by the end of the century. 

> Keep Reading

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