Report | Environment Massachusetts Research and Policy Center

Shining Cities 2017

Solar power grew at a record-breaking pace in 2016. The United States now has 42 gigawatts (GW) of solar photovoltaic (PV) energy capacity, enough to power 8.3 million homes and reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 52.3 million metric tons annually.1 Hundreds of thousands of Americans, especially in our cities, have invested in their own solar panels or solar projects in their communities and millions more are ready to join them.

Report | Environment Massachusetts

Doubling Down on Climate Progress

To tackle the climate crisis, we need to quickly shift away from dirty fossil fuels and towards 100 percent renewable energy. The Northeast and Mid-Atlantic states are leading the way with the best regional clean air and climate protection program in the country: the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative. 

Report | Environment Massachusetts Research and Policy Center

Renewable Energy 100: The Course to a Carbon-Free Campus

America’s institutions of higher education can play a crucial role in the fight to prevent the worst impacts of global warming. Colleges and universities across the country should aggressively deploy clean energy on campus, setting a goal of getting 100 percent of their energy from clean renewable sources.

Report | Environment Massachusetts Research & Policy Center and MASSPIRG Education Fund

Get the Lead Out

Over the past two years, the tragedy of Flint, Michigan has stunned the nation.  We watched the drinking water of an entire city become contaminated with lead.  And now we know this toxic threat extends well beyond Flint to communities across the country. The health threat of lead in schools’ water deserves immediate attention from state and local policymakers.

Report | Environment America Research & Policy Center

Get the Lead Out

Over the past two years, the tragedy of Flint, Michigan has stunned the nation. We watched the drinking water of an entire city become contaminated with lead. And now we know this toxic threat extends well beyond Flint to communities across the country. In fact, test results now show that lead is even contaminating drinking water in schools and pre-schools — flowing from thousands of fountains and faucets where our kids drink water every day.

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